DramaHub

Senses and Feelings


















Creating Emotions

Procedure:

 Choose a line to say that could be said in many different ways. For example, the line could be “You’ve got to be kidding me” or “Oh my gosh!” or any other similar lines. Break the players into partners or small groups. First instruct the players to say the line using different emotions such as excited, angry, disappointed, or nervous. After the players have a sense of the different emotions, they can pantomime a scene in which they use only that line. The other groups or partners can guess what was happening in the scene.

Side Coaching:

Be sure to encourage the players to be very specific in their movements and emotions. 























Tapping into one's Senses and Feelings is vital to portraying a convincing character. Through participation in sensory experiences, actors should be able to increase their awareness of and ability to express sensory perceptions and feelings through facial and bodily reaction, as well as through vocal response. 

Guide Dog

Procedure:

Instruct the players to partner up. One partner will close their eyes while the other will lead them around a room and will do three tasks. For example, the tasks may be to tap on a specific table three times, to pick up a stapler, and to sit in a specific chair. They cannot touch their partner and can only use their voice as guidance. After the three tasks have been completed, the partners can switch.

 Side Coaching:

Instruct the players to be very specific. Instead of just “walking forward” say, “walk ten steps.”

Dog Bone

Procedure: 

A chair is required for this game, as well as an item to put under the chair. It doesn’t  matter what the object is, this will represent the bone. The objective of this game is to focus the sense of hearing. Players must really tune into what they’re hearing in order to win the game. To play this game, one player will be chosen as the dog, and sit on the chair. Underneath the chair will  be his/her bone. The player will sit in the chair with his or her back facing away from the rest of  the group. The instructor will tap one of the players to tell them they are to  steal the dog’s bone. The player can be as quiet or as loud as they'd like when retrieving the  bone. This player will then return to the group and will hide the bone behind them. The rest of the  players will also pretend to hide the bone behind them, so it’s not obvious which person has the bone. The "dog" will then turn around and guess who stole his/her bone. Repeat  the game enough times so that all, or most, or the player get to be either the dog, or the  bone stealer.


Side Coaching:


Encourage the "dog" to really listen. Do some people walk differently than others? Can you hear their breathing? 























Draw the Shape

Procedure:

Instruct the players to find a partner. One player of each pair will see the instructor for a very specific shape on a piece of paper. Without saying the shape, this person will go their partner and describe the shape, its place on the page, and its size, without actually describing any of these things. After one partner has tried, the other partner can have a turn as well.

Side Coaching:

Make sure the players are very specific. How high or low on the paper is the shape? How big is it? How do you describe a circle or a triangle?

Feelings Bag

Procedure:

The day before the game is to be played, instruct the players to bring in a medium size bag filled with different items that all have something in common. For example, they could be similar in category such as office supplies, round things, or beach things. They could also be similar in how they feel, such as things that are soft, or cold. On the day of the game, instruct all the players to put their bags in a circle. Label each bag and instruct the players to go to each bag and reach in without looking and feel the objects within. When they think they know the connection, they can write it down, without revealing their answers. After the players have gone to each bag, instruct them to voice their ideas for each bag. After each bag has been guessed, instruct the players to empty out their bags. Who was right?

 Side Coaching

Make sure the players really use their sense of touch and imagination to think both envision the items in the bag, but also what underlying themes they have. Are they just soft, or are they also round? 























































What’s On the Table and Where?

Procedure:

Instruct the players to bring a few items for the game (two is a good number). Instruct the players to place their items on a table. With all the players, there should be an adequate amount of things on the table. The players get ten seconds to look at the table and try to memorize all the items on the table and the place they are located. After ten seconds, the players can use a piece of paper to write down everything they remember. They can receive one point for every item they remember and one point or putting it in the correct place.


Side Coaching:

Is there a way to remember these things better? Encourage the students to try to find a connection between the items. 































Change Three

Procedure:

Instruct the players to find a partner. Have the partners face one another and really observe how each person looks and what they are wearing. After about ten seconds instruct the partners to turn their back to one another. One partner will change three things about their appearance. It could be subtle or very obvious. When the partners are ready, they can turn around and make their guesses for what three things have been changed. Once they have guessed, they can switch and play again. 

 Side Coaching:

Encourage the players to use a combination of obvious and subtle changes. Did they take off a belt or put their jacket over their head? 

Grocery List

Procedure:

The game begins with the group in a circle. Have the group suggest a list of about five grocery items. After the list is complete, have the group suggest five different emotions. Then have the group recite the grocery list using those one of the emotions. Continue to recite the grocery list using each of the five emotions, until all the emotions have been experienced.

Side Coaching:


Encourage the players to choose very different emotions. For example, instead of “happy” and “content,” try “happy” and “sad.” In addition, encourage the group to use the space they have to experience the emotions.